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20130124
20130201
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of a software strategy of a number of years at picking what we would call winners, zero, hamas, hezbollah, shia groups, even the muslim brotherhood political ally and key regional arenas across the middle east. this year's line that are the islamic republic of iran on these groups have paid off because now their regional allies have become the most influential players in their respective arenas today. the result is today's the islamic republic of iran and its ideas of the pacific tory government and independent foreign policy that has real influence, real power in countries across the middle east from egypt to bahrain that were once clearly in america's camp. in strategic terms, the islamic republic of iran has been dependencies into its narrative not its drones, not its tanks, using political awakening of middle eastern public to offer the very nature of power politics in the middle east. at least describe in our book, to "going to tehran," it has been effective foreign policy and national security strategy for the islamic republic of iran, one repeatedly underappreciated in the united states.
, hezbollah, shia groups in iraq, even the muslim brotherhood in egypt as its political allies in key regional arenas across the middle east. and this yearslong bet by the islamic republic of iran on these groups has paid off, because now their regional allies have become the most influential players in their respective arenas today. the result is that today it is the islamic republic of iran and its ideas of participatory islamist governance and an independent foreign policy that has real influence, real power in countries across the middle east from egypt to baa rape that were -- bahrain that were once clearly in america's camp. in strategic terms, the islamic republic of iran has been and is using through its narrative not its drones, not its tanks, through its narrative they are using the political awakening of middle eastern publics to alter the very nature of power politics in the middle east. as we describe in our book "downing to tehran," this has been an effective foreign policy and national security strategy for the islamic republic of iran, one that is exactly and repeatedly underap
talks with the iranian regime not to mention direct talks with hamas, hezbollah and syria as well. he's pressed that such talks should proceed without the backing gained from other more forceful credible options. this approach is far too weak to be effective and reveals a person less committed to results than this critical moment demands. the second track of the comprehensive search for a solution is sanctions. i have supported all legislative efforts to create and impose both unilateral and multilateral sanctions on iran. leveraging similar commitments from our friends have been possible in pursuing sanctions when necessary. it has been limited to impose sanctions that arguably stiffened the spine of the international community and made increasingly harsh multilateral regimes possible. senator hagel does not see it that way. he repeatedly voted against sanctions legislation, even opposing those aimed at their iranian revolutionary guard corps which at the time was killing our troops in iraq. he has long argued against sanctions imposed by the united states absent an international jud
.s. that hezbollah is getting weapons? >> again, i don't have anything for you on questions about those reports. i would refer you to the israeli government. >> a u.s. official is quoted talking about this. you can't give us anything. >> again, i don't have anything for you. >> in the hearings on capitol hill going on right now, senator riegle has been taking tough questions. with regard to something he said, does the president believe the government of iran is legitimately elected? >> and sorry, said that again. >> to the presently the government of ron is legitimate in elective? >> i think our views of us president's election were to be expressed. the president's views on that matter, and our views on the behavior of the regime in tehran are expressed again and again and again. the fact is, we judge a run by his behavior, not by its words, by its actions, and they are consistently in violation of the united nations obligations, the international obligations and because of that they are enduring the most intense sanctions regime in history that has had a dramatic impact on their economy as well a
force or hezbollah. we have a fundamental interest in helping the states of that area govern stably. and in the real world as it is today, happily, our values are generally embraced. and so that kind of government requires not using f-16s against your people, not, you know, machine gunning them to death, allowing elections to proceed in an open and honest way. this is not simply a question of we think everyone should be like us. this is a question of whether you want states to be stable in the world or whether you wallet the world to be a chaotic -- you want the world to be a chaotic hotwed of opportunities for our -- hotbed of opportunities. >> okay. can we take another question? yes, sir. [inaudible] >> congressman jo bonner, wanted to ask about the intelligence aspect and the brand nomination, how those two things may relate whether or not, you know, shifting from looking at state-based collecting and analysis as opposed to just looking so much more at not state actors, terrorist groups, things like that. >> will you repeat the question and answer it? >> the question is about int
for reasons you know in regard to relating to hezbollah in lebanon. how real is that danger and if it is going to happen, my question is, what are you going to do? at this point it seems it is already happening. >> there is a saying in lebanon, in time of nations change please save your head. >> what does that mean? >> it means we are disassociating ourself from what is going on in syria by all means. we are associating because we have a kind of a historical geographic relation with syria and now today if we take any position, really we would be more -- our lebanese society and between the lebanese citizens. we had a position to disassociate ourselves but this doesn't mean that we disassociate ourself from humanitarian issue. today we are helping and receiving syrians who are insuring for them, sheltering, medical care, schooling, food, everything. also this document mean that we don't have to put all scenarios in front of us and to see what kind of implication it will affect us in the future. i would love to talk about the options but before talking about options we have three questions we ha
to sign a letter asking the european union to labor hezbollah -- to label hezbollah as a terror group, even though it is so designated by the united states state department. he is the same person who urged president bush to offer iran -- quote -- "direct, uncondition l, and comprehensive talks." close quote. he's the same person who called for establishing a united states diplomatic mission in tehran. he's the same person who dismissed -- quote -- "a military strike against iran as -- quote -- "not a viecialtion feasible, responsible option." he's the same person who suggested that the united states might be able to live with a nuclear iran. during his years in this chamber, senator hagel's opposition to iran's sanctions placed him in a very, very small minority. for example, only one other senator had joined him in voting against sanctions in 2001 and only one other senate banking committee member ginned hi joind him i voting against a different package. senator hagel has no credibility on perhaps the biggest foreign policy challenge facing the obama administration's second term and
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7